19.12.2013

Salt and pepper …to taste

19.12.2013

Salt and pepper …to taste

I am a professional photographer, and when I finish shooting, I usually make a b-line to my computer to work on my images.
Maybe it’s because it’s all I do for my work, but I try to avoid using my computer when I don’t have to. As a result, I tend to use my iPhone for all my instragram hobbying.

I spend a lot of time editing photos–sometimes in the train, sometimes in the bath, sometimes before I go to bed. I use up to 5 to or 6 applications for one photo.
You might be surprised at the sheer number of apps that will leave people saying “you did THAT with an iPhone app? And not even an expensive one?”
It’s no wonder I have amassed over 400 photo-editing apps for my iPhone and iPad.
The fact that you can use the iPhone to easily and conveniently process photos at any time makes it a perfect lifestyle match.
All in the palm of your hand(smile).
(As an aside, I’m writing this entire column with a writing app on my iPhone. Are you wondering yet, just how crazy I am about the iPhone?)
I have written about this before but I like to style my photos with vivid and crisp colors. I first use snapseed (though it’s free, this super app has many amazing features) to square down my photos.
instagram displays only square format pictures so I try not to take landscape or portrait photos.
This is not necessarily ideal…it makes it tough, for example, when you are creating a postcard or photos for exhibitions, etc.

I have gotten off track a little, but after rendering photos square, I correct the photos by intensifying the colors and adjusting the contrast…
..by deepening the reds for evening photos… by accenting the blues in clear skies photos.. and by emphasizing the shadows.
Sometimes I have an “airy” photo phase, taking “high-key” photos with low color intensity. But when I upload them, I usually end up making the colors deeper. I’d say this is more of an instinctive thing than a work habit.
I add elements with effects apps such as picfx and lensflare for dramatic and clear photos.

Furthermore, using an app called “artstudio”, which puts Photoshop to shame, you can cut out a silhouette and combine it with different backgrounds, and using double exposure applications such as imageblender, you can superimpose images.
To me processing is like a flavor enhancer, used to give more impact to your photos.
I always try to keep in mind that it’s not the processing that makes the photo, but the photo that determines the processing.
Having said that, don’t let me be misunderstood — I’m actually not recommending processing.
Many of the over 100 million IG users have decided on not processing photos or using only photos taken with iPhone, so I want to make it clear this is my preference only.
So it is just as in cooking where salt and pepper are added –to taste– by the chef ( smiley face).

Wacamera
wacamera.com

Profession: photographer. I started using instagram 3 years ago. Through instagram, I create images based on shapes etc. that appeal to me. The only processing I use is that offered by my iPhone and iPad. I mostly go on photography expeditions with my friends. Next month I’m going abroad to take photos.

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